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The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.


The golden era of the Vistula River is long gone. There is no need anymore to closely monitor the river's traffic flow or deepen its channels and clean up debris on the banks. The signals and signposts have all but disappeared. Passenger steamboats no longer cruise up and down the river, and push-boats from Gdansk have ceased to tow barges laden with grain. The ships moored at the river's wharfs have moved, and the once busy shipyard has left Warsaw for good. Times have changed, and the golden years for people with close ties to the Vistula River, like Bogdan, a push-boat mechanic, have also ended. The river had been their destiny and their way of life. The bond was so strong that it now threatens their whole existence. They speak of nothing else but changes in the currents, the manoeuvres to be used when in shallow waters, or the welding methods for a ship's metal hull. They talk about the river routes and brag about three-metre catfish and gigantic sturgeons. Today, their knowledge and skills are no longer needed. Like their ships and barges, river ports and wharfs, they have been discarded. As a mode of transport and communication, the Vistula River has lost its importance, and its role these days has been reduced to looking pretty and staying relatively clean. The people connected with its former functions have been made redundant.